• Informed

    Better informed patients lead to improved outcomes

  • Compassionate

    Patient-Centric Approach

  • Liberating

    Freedom to voice your needs and concerns

  • Understanding

    Dr Gandy listens and cares

  • Proficient

    Improvement of patient care

Referrers

Dear Doctor,

Thank you for considering our services.

Why choose Us

We offer the best evidenced based practice to our patients. As general surgeons, we can offer a wide range of services to GPs and specialist assessment of all upper GI, hepatobiliary and pancreatic conditions. We also offer diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy to private and public patients.

We aim to communicate promptly, clearly and concisely with patients and referrers.

We provide a full service to all public and private patients with ‘No gap’ options are available.

As a relatively new practice, with access to regular public hospital operating lists, waiting lists are managed efficiently to avoid long waits. We welcome GPs to contact us should their patients deteriorate during surgical waiting times.

I live close to the hospital and are available to our patients and new referrals at short notice, if required.

Events & Seminars

Should you or your practice wish to arrange a educatonal event or seminar or get to know you visit, we would be happy to arrange this. Please use the contact us form or call +61 (02) 8599-4360+61 (02) 8599-4360, during office hours.

After Hours’ Referrals

Dr Gandy is happy to pass his personal contacts to general and hospital practitioners for in-hours or after-hour referrals. Please contact my consulting rooms for details or complete the urgent referrers contact form for a callback.

Urgent Referrals

If available, and he usually is, Dr Gandy is happy to accept emergency referrals to both the private and public hospital. Out of office hours this will often require admission via the emergency department. However, waiting times will be minimised by alerting the admitting officer to an expected arrival under a named consultant. Dr Gandy also participates in the acute care surgery programme, which provides onsite specialist cover to all emergency surgical admissions.

Morning Colonoscopy Instructions

Prior to the procedure you will need to purchase Prepkit C from your local pharmacy, unless otherwise instructed.  Prepkit C includes 1 sachet of glycoprep and 2 sachets of Picoprep. The colonoscopy prep tastes bad, cooling it in the fridge it makes it more palatable.  The aim of the prep is to produce watery diarrhoea.

Preparation instructions for morning colonoscopy

The success of your examination depends on the bowel being as clear as possible, otherwise the examination may need to be postponed and the preparation repeated.

PLEASE FOLLOW THESE INSTRUCTIONS ONLY – IGNORE THE INSTRUCTIONS ON THE PREPKIT- C KIT

Two days before the examination

  • Stop eating meat, brown bread, cereals, fruit or vegetables. Do not eat foods containing seeds.
  • You may eat eggs, cottage cheese, plain yoghurt, white bread, white fish, chicken well cooked and peeled pumpkin or potato. You may have clear jelly, milk and drink plenty of approved clear liquids. Some suggested recipes are included in this Fact Sheet.
  • Approved clear liquids are: water, clear broth/bouillon, clear fruit juices, plain jelly (not red or purple). Black tea or coffee, sports drinks (not red or purple), clear fruit cordials (not red or purple), clear salty fluids (chicken soup), Lucozade.

One day before the examination

  • You may have breakfast in accordance with the aforementioned diet and approved clear liquids as needed throughout the day (no milk products after breakfast).
  • Prior to commencing PREPKIT C add entire contents of ONE sachet of PICOPREP in a glass of warm water (approx. 250ml) and stir until dissolved. Place in refrigerator to chill. The second sachet of PICOPREP can then be added to a glass of warm water (approx. 250ml) and stirred until dissolved, and placed in refrigerator to chill.
  • Dilute entire pack of GLYCOPREP-C 70g in a litre of warm water and stir until dissolved. This can be made up in the morning or earlier in afternoon and placed in the refrigerator to chill.

First dose - 4pm Drink one glass of PICOPREP mixture slowly but completely. This should be followed by at least two glasses of water or approved clear liquids over the next hour.

Second dose - 5pm You should drink a glass of the GLYCOPREP every 15 minutes. Total intake time should take 1 hour in duration. If you start to feel nauseated whilst drinking the preparation, slow down the rate of intake. A drinking straw can often be helpful.

Third dose – 6pm You should now drink the second glass of PICOPREP. This should be followed by at least two glasses of water or approved clear liquids over the next hour.

Day of examination

Colonoscopy only

You may continue approved clear liquids (no more than 200ml per hour, no milk, soups or jellies) until 5am on the day of your procedure.

Arrive at the hospital at the scheduled admission time.

Colonoscopy and Gastroscopy (endoscopy via mouth)

As above, but do not eat or drink anything for 6 hours prior to the scheduled admission time.

After the procedure

You will be able to eat and drink 30 mins after your procedure and will be discharged after 1.5 to hours.  You will not be able to drive and will need to collected by a friend or relative

Should you have any questions contact Dr Gandy’s office to confirm instructions

Click here to download the PDF

Afternoon Colonoscopy Instructions

Prior to the procedure you will need to purchase Prepkit C from your local pharmacy, unless otherwise instructed.  Prepkit C includes 1 sachet of glycoprep and 2 sachets of Picoprep. The colonoscopy prep tastes bad, cooling it in the fridge it makes it more palatable.  The aim of the prep is to produce watery diarrhoea.

Preparation instructions for afternoon colonoscopy

The success of your examination depends on the bowel being as clear as possible, otherwise the examination may need to be postponed and the preparation repeated.

PLEASE FOLLOW THESE INSTRUCTIONS ONLY - IGNORE THE INSTRUCTIONS ON THE PREPKIT- C KIT

Two days before the examination

  • Stop eating meat, brown bread, cereals, fruit or vegetables. Do not eat foods containing seeds.
  • You may eat eggs, cottage cheese, plain yoghurt, white bread, white fish, chicken well cooked and peeled pumpkin or potato. You may have clear jelly, milk and drink plenty of approved clear liquids. Some suggested recipes are included in this Fact Sheet.
  • Approved clear liquids are: water, clear broth/bouillon, clear fruit juices, plain jelly (not red or purple). Black tea or coffee, sports drinks (not red or purple), clear fruit cordials (not red or purple), clear salty fluids (chicken soup), Lucozade.

One day before the examination

  • You may have breakfast and lunch in accordance with the aforementioned diet – up until 1pm. During the day, drink as many glasses of the approved clear liquids as needed (no milk products after lunch).
  • Prior to commencing PREPKIT C add entire contents of ONE sachet of PICOPREP in a glass of warm water (approx. 250ml) and stir until dissolved. Place in refrigerator to chill. The second sachet of PICOPREP can then be added to a glass of warm water (approx. 250ml) and stirred until dissolved, and placed in refrigerator to chill.
  • Dilute entire pack of GLYCOPREP-C 70g in a litre of warm water and stir until dissolved. This can be made up in the morning or earlier in afternoon and placed in the refrigerator to chill.

First dose - 5 pm Drink one glass of PICOPREP mixture slowly but completely. This should be followed by at least two glasses of water or approved clear liquids over the next hour.

Second dose - 7pm You should drink a glass of the GLYCOPREP every 15 minutes. Total intake time should take 1 hour in duration. If you start to feel nauseated whilst drinking the preparation, slow down the rate of intake. A drinking straw can often be helpful.

Day of examination

Third dose (either 6am or 7am - see below) 

7am - For Colonoscopy only

You should now drink the second glass of PICOPREP. This should be followed by at least two glasses of water or approved clear liquids over the next hour. You may continue approved clear liquids (no more than 200ml per hour, no milk, soups or jellies) until 11.30am on the day of your procedure. Arrive at the hospital at the scheduled admission time. 6 am –for

6am - For Colonoscopy and Gastroscopy (endoscopy via mouth)

You should now drink the second glass of PICOPREP. This should be followed by at least two glasses of water or approved clear liquids over the next hour. Do not eat or drink anything for 6 hours prior to your scheduled admission time.

After the procedure

You will be able to eat and drink 30 mins after your procedure and will be discharged after 1.5 to hours.  You will not be able to drive and will need to collected by a friend or relative

Click here to download the PDF

Upper GI Endoscopy Instructions

If you are also undergoing colonoscopy and gastroscopy, please ignore these instructions and see instructions for morning or afternoon colonoscopy

General instructions

To ensure the stomach is empty to your procedure, you must not eat or drink within 6 hours of your procedure, unless you have been instructed otherwise by your doctor.

You may and drink normally up to 6 hours prior to the procedure.

If you are having a morning procedure this means having nothing to eat or drink after 2am on the day of the procedure. For an afternoon gastroscopy, you may eat an early light breakfast (before 7am) and then nothing to eat or drink.

Your procedure may be delayed or cancelled if you have eaten or drunk within 6 hours of procedure.

After the procedure

You will be able to eat and drink 30 mins after your procedure and will be discharged after 1.5 to hours.  You will not be able to drive and will need to collected by a friend or relative

What are the side effects of endoscopy?

The most common side effect is feeling bloated. Some people have nausea because of the medicines used before the procedure. If this happens to you, your doctor can give you medicine to make the nausea better. Most people can eat as usual after the procedure.

Other rare side effects that can occur include:

  • Food from the stomach getting into the lungs
  • Bleeding, for example, after a growth is removed
  • Getting a tear in the digestive tract lining
  • Having redness or swelling of the skin around the IV

Should I call my doctor?

Call your doctor or nurse immediately if you have any of the following problems after your upper endoscopy:

  • Belly pain that is much worse than gas pain or cramps
  • A bloated and hard belly
  • Vomiting
  • Fever
  • Trouble swallowing or severe throat pain
  • Black bowel movements
  • A “crunching” feeling under the skin in the neck

Click here to download the PDF

Colonoscopy

What to Expect?

Before the test, a doctor will review the procedure with you, including possible complications, and ask you to sign a consent form.

An IV line will be inserted in your hand or arm. Your blood pressure, heart rate, and breathing will be monitored during the test.

The Colonoscopy Procedure

You will be given fluid and medicines through the IV line. With sedation/analgesia provided during the colonoscopy, many people sleep during the test, while others are very relaxed, comfortable, and generally not aware. Your doctor may request an anaesthetist give you an anaesthetic agent (for example, propofol), which is a stronger sedative and will put you to sleep while you are being closely monitored.

The colonoscope is a long black flexible tube, approximately the diameter of the index finger. The doctor will gently pump air and sterile water or saline through the scope into the colon to inflate it and allow the doctor to see the entire lining. You might feel bloating or gas cramps as the air opens the colon. Try not to be embarrassed about passing this gas (it is just air), and let your doctor know if you are uncomfortable. You may feel like you have to go to the bathroom, which is a normal feeling during the procedure.

During the procedure, the doctor might take a biopsy (small pieces of tissue) or remove polyps. Polyps are growths of tissue that can range in size from the tip of a pen to several inches. Most polyps are benign (not cancerous). However, some polyps can become cancerous if allowed to grow for a long time. Having a polyp removed does not hurt.

Colonoscopy

After the colonoscopy, you will be observed in a recovery area, usually for about 30 to 60 minutes until the effects of the sedative medication wear off. The most common complaint after colonoscopy is a feeling of bloating and gas cramps. You should pass gas and not feel embarrassed doing this either during or after the procedure. This will relieve your feelings of bloating and cramping. You may also feel groggy from the sedation medications. You should not return to work, drive, or drink alcohol that day. Most people can eat normally after the test. Ask your doctor when it is safe to restart aspirin and other blood-thinning medications.

Complications  

Colonoscopy is a safe procedure, and complications are rare but can occur:

  • Bleeding can occur from biopsies or the removal of polyps, but it is usually minimal and can be controlled.
  • The colonoscope can cause a tear or hole in the colon. This is a serious problem, but it does not happen commonly.
  • It is possible to have side effects from the sedative medicines.
  • Although colonoscopy is the best test to examine the colon, it is possible for even the most skilled doctors to miss or overlook an abnormal area in the colon.

You should call your doctor immediately if you have any of the following:

  • Severe abdominal pain (not just gas cramps)
  • A firm, bloated abdomen
  • Vomiting
  • Fever
  • Rectal bleeding (greater than a couple of tablespoons [30 mL])